Staveley Mottos

Research to date would indicate a general commonality of arms design by all later branches of the Staveleys, but varieties of mottos as follows:

BRIDLINGTON - FIDELIS AD URNAM - Faithful to the grave

Shown, along with the Stags heads/chevron/lozenge device, on the family memorial in Hunmanby Church but it is confirmed by the College of Arms in London that no grant was ever made to this family, so they look to have been a little presumptuous! Indeed, Richard Staveley 1631-72 was ‘disclaimed’ at the Lent Assizes in York in 1668 for ‘usurping the names and titles of gentlemen without authority’ i.e. using the Staveley Coat of Arms to which he was not entitled! (despite buying Bessingby Manor in 1659 and being a Bridlington Key Warden in 1668). It would appear however that the Bridlington line continued to adopt this practice for many more years!

IRISH BRANCH --  FIDELIS AD URNAM - Faithful to the grave

The Irish Staveleys acquired their ‘arms’ via the grant to Robert Jones Staveley (1791-1845) being “Argent on a Chevron between three lozenges gules, as many bucks heads caboshed Or”. Clearly this Staveley colour scheme is very red and quite unlike the blue or black variations usually found and can be seen in Fig. 6 Appendix 30). Robert Jones Staveley was a lawyer in Dublin reputedly very well off and living at Glanduff Castle in County Limerick. He applied to the Chief Herald of Ireland in 1840 – then an agent of the Crown and was granted the right to use the coat of arms. This relates to the line of descent emanating from the ‘Legend’ going back to the Yorkshire line of 1650 and before although the Herald’s Office which wrote out an extensive family tree did not make a definite connection to any armigerous Yorkshire grantee of an earlier period. The blazon is a ‘difference’ to virtually all the other original Yorkshire Staveleys (this time being red) although, as said, no proven link, yet, has ever been made to connect the two branches (see chapter on ‘legend’ and the Irish tree). Robert Jones appears to have chosen a new motto. Latterly the Bridlington branch (which do not it seems, ever had an official ‘grant of arms’) adopted this design and motto on the Hunmanby memorial in, I believe, the mistaken view that these two branches were connected from the 17th Century. (see chapter on the Bridlington line). This Irish grant was given to all descendants of Robert I, irrespective of whether they were older sons or not.

OXFORD/LEICESTER BRANCH - PATIOR UT POTIAR - I endure in order to gain

The arms taken by this line must relate back to the founder of this line namely those of William Staveley 1430-1498. What is fascinating about that is the fact that his arms are IDENTICAL to the Thormanby line (and later London/Bucks awards which were his descendants) being:-  “Argent on a Chevron azure between 3 lozenges sable, 3 bucks heads Or” (A silver shield on which is a blue Chevron and three black lozenges. On the Chevron are three gold bucks heads. See Fig. 8 Appendix 30). It was his younger brother John, (b.abt 1435), who I believe was the likely founder of the Thormanby line.

DEVONSHIRE BRANCH - NIL DESPERANDUM - Never despair

THORMANBY BRANCH (present owners of Stainley Hall) - NIL DESPERANDUM - Never despair

ORIGINAL NORTH STAINLEY BRANCH - UT ASPIRAT CERVUS - Aspirations of the Stag

Author: Peter Staveley

 

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